Imagine “As If…”

Imagine your plans turning out exactly as if it was supposed to.

magic_wand

We all have our moments where we imagine how things can go wrong. Sure, “stuff happens,” but not as often as we think it does, and when it does, it’s usually not as bad as we thought it could be.

Picture everything working out the way you want it to.

Imagine how you’ll feel when you get what you worked for. Think about what the success will feel like. Fill yourself with the emotions and beliefs of accomplishment.

Even if it doesn’t turn out exactly the way you thought it would, you’ll still enjoy the ride much more.

(Besides, can it hurt to imagine the best?)

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Give More Than You Take; You’ll Get More in the End

Understand that giving take more strength than taking.

adult hand & baby finger

Yet the rewards are far greater.

Find ways to give more often.

Don’t get locked into the idea that giving is merely materialistic.

Open a door for a stranger. Let a car get in front of you in traffic. Pick up a piece of trash on the street.

Remember, if you don’t have money, give time.
If you don’t have time, give a smile.

If you don’t have a smile, ask for help.

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Getting Out of My Own Way

Of late, I’ve taken on yet another new assignment.

I’m “chat coaching,” a steep-learning-curve experience I assure you.

live-chat-keyboard

Should you be unfamiliar with chat coaching, I shall explain. I log into a website from my home computer, which is connected to a main server in cyberspace. On the other side of the void, should someone need guidance, they click on a button on their screen and their “call” is routed to me on my computer. He or she types. I reply via the same method. If you were asking, “Wouldn’t it be easier with a phone?” The answer is probably “yes.” However, that’s not how it works and I’ve agreed to the terms. To be honest, I’m actually growing to enjoy the procedure – short of the carpal tunnel issues for which I must be on guard.

In effect, this type of communication can be best analogized as a very slow moving conversation, especially since the policies require appropriate grammar, correct spelling, and avoiding emoticons and abbreviations (like “BTW” or “LOL”). The repercussions of having such time in between transactions allow one’s thoughts to drift, which lends itself to me making judgments — fair or otherwise — about who is on the other end, based entirely on how long it takes for a reply and what shows up when it happens.

With that as backstory, today someone logged in and began the conversation with the most ridiculously moronic questions.

“Really?” I thought, “Are you serious?”

Her query was so “beyond the pale,” that I first assumed I had snared a “troll.” (No, not the long-haired, full-bellied, naked toys of the seventies. Rather these are nasty individuals who enjoy annoying, frustrating, or insulting other people in cyberspace, merely because they can get away with it.)

Yet, with the passage of a few paragraphs of correspondence, I understood that the young woman on the other end wasn’t trolling, but was instead severely developmentally disabled. Obviously, her skill set allowed use of the system but her text was burdened with so many typos, it was near impossible to untangle, and the speed at which she replied would make a beginning typist feel like a thirty-year executive secretary. But most importantly, she couldn’t grasp even the simplest concepts.

[Read more…]

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Expect More

dream-written-in-sand

Research has shown that our ancient ancestors were pessimists.

When you think about that, it makes sense. In their day, they always had to assume that everything would go wrong so they could anticipate problems in advance. That’s how they survived.

People who didn’t think “worst case scenario” that did not survive as long.

Although we are no longer living in those times, their genetics have been passed down to us and therefore, we’re basically “hard wired” to be pessimistic. We still tend to default to believing that if something can go wrong, it will.

What would it feel like to believe that we might actually do better than we thought?

How empowering would that be? What would you do differently if you assumed that your success would be greater than you imagined – rather than worse?

Dream bigger every chance you get.

It can’t hurt – and the ride will be much more fun no matter how it turns out.

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