Positive Attitude is not Enough

A positive attitude only gets you so far.

climbing-mountain

If you’re not in shape for the climb, you’re still going to die half way up the mountain.

There’s nothing wrong with a positive attitude. It’s never harmful – and many times it’s essential.

However, unless you put it into action, it won’t do a thing. There is no substitute for hard work.

Think positive – and then positively act.

Special thanks to https://www.facebook.com/larrymersereau where I found the inspiration for today’s topic.

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Change in Pace: 3 Ways to Improve Boring Meetings

boring meeting

Meetings are boring, but surviving them seems to be a right of passage in the American workforce. Part of your job description could probably be listed as “endure endless meetings” – even when you are the manager running the show. Meetings do not have to follow the same stale formula without any deviation. You can make the exception to the rule through mixing extra planning and liberal doses of creative thinking into these office gatherings.

Involve everyone

The simplest antidote to a boring meeting is to get everyone involved in the discussion. People become more invested in a meeting when they feel like their presence matters.

Involve the entire group in a meeting and you can enhance the quality of decisions. A study done at Cal-State Northridge found that group discussions are effective in making more information available, generating more ideas, reducing individual bias and producing a decision with fewer errors.

It can start with taking attention away from the person leading the meeting and turning the spotlight back on the group. Encourage people to speak out with ideas and suggestions. Ask open-ended questions. Breakout into group discussions. Give everyone in the meeting a chance to get involved in the decision-making process.

Avoid information overload

Meetings can feel overwhelming if there is too much information to take in all at once. You can prevent this problem by setting an agenda ahead of a scheduled meeting. The agenda can guide what things are discussed in the meeting and offer a road map for the direction of the meeting.

It helps to tackle one issue at a time. Multitasking can serve a good purpose in some situations, but can be a negative influence in a meeting. WebMD notes that the average person can actually lose time shifting between two tasks and take longer to accomplish each task.

One meeting cannot focus on every problem at hand. Set priorities and tackle issues one at a time in order of importance. When things are more specific, it can allow for shorter meetings and better results.

A good rule of thumb is to focus on the issues that are most pertinent to the people in the meeting. This will make it easier to solve problems because you can involve those same people in creating a solution. It allows them to take ownership of the meeting and become more engaged in driving the discussion in positive directions.

Make it count

Meetings represent a significant investment of both time and money. There is no excuse for having a meeting that does not accomplish a tangible purpose.

Make each meeting count by following up on the decisions made in the meeting. The founder of GoDaddy, Bob Parsons, notes that effective leadership requires always moving forward. A leader, according to Parsons, should never stop investing, improving or doing something new because a lack of improvement causes organizations to die.

When you solve problems in meetings, apply those solutions outside the conference room. A meeting that produces measurable results is not a waste of time. Measure progress and offer positive reinforcement to the whole staff when goals are met. It will reinforce the original meeting’s value.

About the Author: Samuel Perry is a PR consultant who lives in Arlington, Va.

Photo used from Flikr by Robert Couse-Baker

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Video: Rebecca Morgan Explains Why She Doesn’t Get Stressed


This is the eighth in a series of Friday Motivational videos with successful people discussing with Scott how to get past what holds you back. In a hallway meeting at a conference (hence the background noise), Scott “Q” Marcus talks with Rebecca Morgan, bestselling author, trusted adviser to executives, international consultant, seminar leader, and speaker; on why her use of to-do lists – as well as an amazing attitude – prevents her from getting stressed out.
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Video: Patrick Donadio on How to get Past Overthinking a Conversation

This is the seventh in a series of Friday Motivational videos with successful people discussing with Scott how to get past what holds you back. In a hallway meeting at a conference, Scott “Q” Marcus talks with nationally recognized speaker, communication expert, author, and coach Patrick Donadio on how to get past overthinking a conversation.
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Three 10-Minute Steps To An Amazing Lunch Break

Your daily lunch break: Is it rushed? Inconvenient? More stressful than relaxing?

 

man-eating-at-deskDo you even take a lunch break, or do you gulp down an energy drink at your desk and keep working ‘til it’s time to commute home?

If that sounds like you, you’re not alone. Most Americans don’t capitalize on the opportunities a workplace break offers to them. Winding down for a half hour in the middle of the day is a healthy habit for mind and body, but a lot of people feel like it’s more of a hassle than a health benefit. In fact, most Americans work straight through what should be a midday reprieve from workplace stress because, for many of us, stepping away from our desks can mean losing momentum and fighting to keep focus for the rest of the afternoon.

If walking away from your desk for a half hour halfway through the day is stressful, you need to reorganize your workday. Lunch breaks are meant to revive your brain and gear you up for the rest of the day. If you’re not taking one, you’re not getting the most out of your professional capacities.

Making the most of your midday break takes preparation; however, in three hassle-free steps, I can take you from noontime stress to 12 p.m. rejuvenation.

All you need is ten minutes.

7 a.m.: Take 10 Minutes To Schedule Your Day

Nothing worth having ever comes without a good deal of planning ahead. Eating well, for instance—any worthwhile regime’s success is heftily contingent on making a game plan and sticking it out. The Truth About Abs reviews, (from one particular eating plan), describe many testaments from folks who’ve only found success losing weight and increasing health through some thorough strategizing. This success is equally applicable to succeeding in the workplace.

So, every morning before you dive head first into the pile of work on your desk, take ten minutes to prioritize tasks and carve blocks of dedicated time out of your workday. Be realistic about your work blocks and give yourself enough time to account for unforeseen distractions, like urgent orders from your boss or a coworker’s request for some last-minute help.

Knowing what’s ahead of you for the day will create a mental map of where your focus needs to be and when, gearing your brain up for when to be on task and when to wind down.

11:30 a.m.: 10 Minutes To Assess Progress And Wind Down

Retrospection is crucial to successful forward movement. Mid-morning, take a look back at what you’ve accomplished.

Not only will this help you plan out the remainder of your afternoon, it will give you a sense of satisfaction. Rehashing your small victories of the morning—maybe you finally turned in a big project to your boss, or were able to deescalate a disagreement with a coworker without issue—will change your brain’s gears from “work, work, and work” to “reward, reward, and reward.”

After recounting the morning’s workload to yourself, spend the hour between your mid-morning check-in and your lunch break tying up loose ends and preparing your work for the afternoon. Don’t start anything too intensive, but don’t let yourself lose focus, either.

Instead, ride on the high of your morning’s victories and create a blueprint for an equally successful afternoon.

12:30 p.m.: 10 Beautiful Minutes Of YOU

Remember: it’s lunch, but it’s also a break. A break for breathing, restoring your energy, and appreciating yourself.

Take your healthy brown-bag lunch on a walk and find a quiet spot in a nearby park, or treat yourself to a health-conscious meal at a restaurant close to where you work. Sit quietly with every bite of your meal and focus on yourself.

Acknowledge any worries or stresses present in the front of your mind, but appreciate foremost the time you’re devoting in this moment to take care of yourself. Being healthy isn’t just about eating lots of veggies and running a mile every day; it’s about loving yourself and wanting the best for you.

If you take a look at, you’ll get an overload of information on the importance of putting a love for yourself ahead of any other goal when it comes to getting healthy.

No matter how you approach it, do yourself—and your health — a favor, and make time for a valuable, reflective lunch break.

About the Author: Dr. Mike Tremba loves lunch breaks, or any chance he gets to appreciate how great life is.  He loves sharing his uncommon weight loss tips through his website at http://www.naturalweightlosstruth.com.  In his free time, he constantly looks for new activities to stir his imagination, while spending time with his wife and best friend, Shari

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