There Will ALWAYS Be More To Do

No matter how efficient you are, there will always be more to do.

woman-buried-in-papers

A major difference between people who are proficient at time management and those who are not is that those who are good at it realize that they will never get everything accomplished – and they’ve come to accept that.

Because of that realization, effective time-managers have learned to let go of as much of the “small stuff” as possible.

If you’re overwhelmed with everything you have to do, invoke the “Five Year Rule.”

Ask yourself, “Will anyone know or care about this five years from now?” If the answer is “no,” let it go. If the answer is “yes,” get to work on it.

The vast majority of tasks fall in the “it’s not that important” category, giving you more time to focus on what really matters.

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Take Time to be Alone

dream-written-in-sand

Take time to be alone more often than you think you need to.

One of the prime triggers in engaging in a bad habit is looking for a way to give to yourself, especially if you’ve been very busy and overwhelmed.  When we don’t take time for ourselves, we end up “rewarding” ourselves with our habits. It’s a way of taking care of ourselves in the moment, but it doesn’t feel so great when we’re done.

If you want to improve the chances you’ll stay on program and you won’t suffer from a “guilt dessert,” take a few minutes to be alone every day; long enough to decompress.

It doesn’t have to be very long, just long enough to get yourself centered.

By the way, “alone” is not “lonely” – unless you choose to make it so.

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What can Happen in one Moment?

Given time and inspiration, what can be accomplished in 100 years?

Just over a century ago, the must-have vehicle was the initial Model T as it rolled forth on rickety spoked wheels for the first time from the Ford assembly line. The traffic signal, invented by Garrett A. Morgan, flashed for the first time 15 years later. (Most likely, although lacking tangible proof, tailgaters, gridlock, and rush hour started when the second automobile hit the streets.)

The radio tuner, allowing listeners to select different stations, transmitted its debut in 1916. Short wave tagged along three years hence. John Logie Baird switched on mechanical televisions, predecessor to modern TVs, in 1925. Frequency modulation (“FM”) first broadcast in 1933 and the earliest color TV flickered to life in 1940. The first cellular phone rang in 1979 (probably in a movie theater).

Medicine marched onward. Sir Frederick Grant Banting invented insulin (1922). Alexander Fleming devised penicillin (1928). Wilson Greatbatch brought life to the internal pacemaker in 1959, followed by Robert Jarvik’s artificial heart in 1978.

Even toys changed. Silly putty bounced and the slinky slinked on to the scene, both in 1943. Mr. Potato Head was appealing in 1952. Cabbage patch kids flew from shelves in 1983.

So much can happen in the passing of a century. Yet, what can one mortal do in only one lifespan?

[Read more…]

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Think Smaller for Better Results

Note: We recently launched of a seminar series, “Five Things You Must Know To Make Your Life Better.”  As part of that series, one of the things we went over were the “10 Commandments of Changing Habits.” This is one of those “commandments.”

Thou shalt think smaller

Make it Small and Do it NOWYou have made the process of changing too big and too complicated. You created your life in small, almost invisible steps. That is the way you will change it.

It sucks, but it’s true.

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Don’t Expect Gurantees of Success

Note: We recently launched of a seminar series, “Five Things You Must Know To Make Your Life Better.”  As part of that series, one of the things we went over were the “10 Commandments of Changing Habits.” This is one of those “commandments.”

Expect not guarantees of success.

woman-running-through-tape

Setting goals does not guarantee you will get to have the results you want.

However, NOT setting them does guarantee that you will stay where you are.

[Read more…]

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