Apparently, Losing Weight IS Rocket Science

For years, I’ve quipped, “Losing weight is not rocket science.

rocket-ship-and-planet

Shut your mouth and move your feet and you’ll drop the weight.” (The difficulty is all the “mental noise” that gets in the way.) Anyway, I’ve been proven wrong, as it apparently IS rocket science.

Let me explain.

I coach folks all across this vast land that find me via the internet or through referral. Of course, if they don’t reside in the community I call home, our sessions are via phone. Consequently, it’s unlikely I’ve met them face-to-face, or even know what they look like. Most times, unless it comes up in conversation, I am unaware of their vocations, as my purpose is to help them guide them past the pitfalls of shedding weight or changing another habit they don’t like about themselves.

With that as backstory, after calling my client, he asked me to hold while he shut the door to avoid disturbing his co-workers. This prompted me to ask, “What do you do for a living?”

“I’m a rocket scientist,” he said, “I study [something I couldn’t even begin to understand about solar winds].”

After getting past my initial geek-fest about really working with someone who is doing what I would have loved to do (if I was willing to have been a better student in college of course), we got down to brass tacks about his progress; which had hit a rough patch. Most people who are losing weight — at a healthy and sustainable pace — drop maybe a pound a week as a long-term average. He had only shed about 16 ounces in three weeks, and was understandably disappointed.

However, what smacked me was how he handled this unhappy slow down.

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Envision Success in its Entirety

There is more to being successful that making lists or affirmations (although they help).

In order to really achieve your goals, you need to see them in their entirety. For example, instead of saying “I want to be healthy,” or “I will weight 150 pounds,” take a few minutes and write down how that looks.

An example might be…

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Monday Motivational Memo: Track it to Change it

That which is tracked grows (or shrinks).

pencils_and_diary

It’s proven time and time again. If you want to build something up, keep track of it.

  • If you want to make more money, track your finances.
  • If you want to improve your attitude, track how grateful you are.
  • If you want to be more fit, track how much exercise you do.

And of course, if you want to lose weight, track what you eat.

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Track What’s Important

That which is important is important enough to track.

pencils_and_diary

If you want more of something, you track it.

  • If you want more money, you track your money.
  • If you want a better relationship, you monitor it.
  • If you want to be healthier, you track your vitals.

Often we don’t pay attention because we’re afraid of what we might see. However, “benign neglect” is a not a strategy for success.

If you’re looking for improvement, find a way to keep track of it.

Just make sure you do so without guilt and shame because…

if guilt and shame were motivational, we’d all be happier healthier and more successful.

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There Will ALWAYS Be More To Do

No matter how efficient you are, there will always be more to do.

woman-buried-in-papers

A major difference between people who are proficient at time management and those who are not is that those who are good at it realize that they will never get everything accomplished – and they’ve come to accept that.

Because of that realization, effective time-managers have learned to let go of as much of the “small stuff” as possible.

If you’re overwhelmed with everything you have to do, invoke the “Five Year Rule.”

Ask yourself, “Will anyone know or care about this five years from now?” If the answer is “no,” let it go. If the answer is “yes,” get to work on it.

The vast majority of tasks fall in the “it’s not that important” category, giving you more time to focus on what really matters.

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