Success is in the Present; Failure is in the Future

When you don’t think you can accomplish your goal, it’s because you’re looking too far down the road.

© jonrawlinson.comYou’re thinking of all the things that could go wrong and of all the obstacles you must overcome, none of which exist if you can focus on the immediate.

When you’re overwhelmed and you’re afraid you won’t be able to achieve your goal, focus on what you can do right this minute.

Make it small enough that you’ll actually do it. [Read more...]

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Join the Seven-day Positivity Challenge!

Every Monday for the last several years I’ve sent out the Monday Motivational Memo (“MMM)”. It’s designed to help you move forward with whatever is holding you back and always offers some small piece of advice.

For the first time in the several hundred MMMs that I’ve sent out, I’m changing the format.

I’m asking YOU to spread a very positive message.

Please join me in making this go viral. The details are below.

My friend, mentor, and Zumba instructor, Greg Parnell, inspired me with this idea. He posted on my Facebook page, three items for which he was grateful and then he challenged me to do the same for seven days.

I accepted this, and I thought

“With all the negativity in the world right now, wouldn’t it a great way to remind us of what’s going well?”

Thank you so much.

What am I asking you to do?

[Read more...]

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Believe in Yourself as Much as you Believe in Others

hands-reaching-outWe are incredibly supportive of our friends and our family.

When they doubt themselves, we are easily able to inspire, encourage, and invigorate them up with all sorts of compliments. As importantly, we truly believe what we’re telling them too.

Yet, when we are talking about ourselves we are not as good of a friend.

[Read more...]

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Anchors A-Weight

There are “big picture” and “smaller picture” health choices.

heart-with-graphA lump in one’s breast is “big picture.” Finding time to take a walk or choosing between deep fried or grilled chicken could be classified, “smaller picture.” Granted making enough wise “smaller picture” health choices is a “big picture” issue in the end. However for discussion sake, “big picture” issues are beyond the control of the every-person, requiring action without delay. “Smaller picture” issues provide choice and possess the luxury of time.

So, although lowering my sodium intake today, a smaller picture issue, will not have a direct affect in the immediate, it could – over time — determine whether or not I get high blood pressure and a stroke, a definite “big picture” issue.

The “big picture” is made of infinite “small pictures.”

“Big pictures” require more knowledge to correct than do “small pictures.” As example, no one has the wherewithal to preform self-administered angioplasty after suffering a myocardial infarction. Conversely, when it comes to the “small picture,” we usually possess enough understanding to know what to do. It doesn’t take a cardio surgeon’s expertise to know that a deep dish, 12-meat-special, 24-inch pizza infused with gooey, dripping, cheese crust is not as healthy as a veggie stir-fry. One need not be an Olympic athlete to recognize that a morning walk is healthier that catching up with gossip on “The View.” Even non-scholars comprehend that reading is a superior way to relax than is the third martini.

We appreciate these to be true. Moreover, unlike “big picture” decisions, we maintain control over our decisions and actions.

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Creatures of Habit

Have you ever really truly analyzed how much of what we do is by rote?

habit-creature

Paying for groceries, the clerk asks,
“How are you?”

Our expected reply, stated without thought:
“Fine, how are you?”

Continuing the script she responds, “Great,” and upon finishing the transaction, adds the obligatory, “Have a nice day.”

Did she really care?

Should we opt to spill our guts about the problems we’re having with aging, would she request the other shoppers stand elsewhere while she counseled, consoled, and cajoled us? Survey says: Not a chance. The brief exchange near the cash register is a pre-ordained, almost-required, nicety; it’s just “what we do.”

That just scratches the surface; dig deeper and discover how much of our lives are run by autopilot.

Picture a typical weekday; we either arise with the help of an alarm — that pushes us to consciousness at the exact same moment as every other weekday — or we don’t use one at all. Upon rising, patterns control everything from the order of our morning constitutional to the clothes we choose. We are either “breakfast eaters” — or not. It’s not “I am” one day and “I’m not” the next. The average grocery store stocks over 40,000 items; yet even those of us who opt for breakfast choose from fewer than a handful of items every morning, the same selections we had yesterday and will eat tomorrow.

[Read more...]

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