Twenty Years at Goal Weight

man-in-diapersI entered the planet at nine pounds 14 ounces.

Assuming that to be normal, thirty years later, as a newly minted father, I panicked when the doctor informed me that my firstborn weighed six pounds six ounces.

Looking me in the eye, attempting to calm my jitters, he replied, “Six-six is normal. I promise he’s fine.”

“But I weighed ten pounds when I was born!” I protested.

“I can’t help it if you were cruel to your mother,” he replied.

Moral of the story: I was born big, and from that moment, packed on the pounds, tipping the scales at ten pounds for every year.

To explain, I weighed 50 pounds at age five, 90 pounds at age nine, and 130 pounds when I was a teen. From there, I accelerated, reaching 230 upon entering high school — poor timing to say the least. Of the 1107 students in my class, I was the second fattest. Further putting this in perspective, that was in the day when childhood obesity was an oddity, rather than unfortunately as it can be today, quite common.

Kids are brutal, so what were supposed to be some of my best years were anything but. Girls ignored me; guys badgered and bullied me.

Physical education was the lowest of the low.

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Success is in the Present; Failure is in the Future

When you don’t think you can accomplish your goal, it’s because you’re looking too far down the road.

© jonrawlinson.comYou’re thinking of all the things that could go wrong and of all the obstacles you must overcome, none of which exist if you can focus on the immediate.

When you’re overwhelmed and you’re afraid you won’t be able to achieve your goal, focus on what you can do right this minute.

Make it small enough that you’ll actually do it. [Read more...]

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Join the Seven-day Positivity Challenge!

Every Monday for the last several years I’ve sent out the Monday Motivational Memo (“MMM)”. It’s designed to help you move forward with whatever is holding you back and always offers some small piece of advice.

For the first time in the several hundred MMMs that I’ve sent out, I’m changing the format.

I’m asking YOU to spread a very positive message.

Please join me in making this go viral. The details are below.

My friend, mentor, and Zumba instructor, Greg Parnell, inspired me with this idea. He posted on my Facebook page, three items for which he was grateful and then he challenged me to do the same for seven days.

I accepted this, and I thought

“With all the negativity in the world right now, wouldn’t it a great way to remind us of what’s going well?”

Thank you so much.

What am I asking you to do?

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Believe in Yourself as Much as you Believe in Others

hands-reaching-outWe are incredibly supportive of our friends and our family.

When they doubt themselves, we are easily able to inspire, encourage, and invigorate them up with all sorts of compliments. As importantly, we truly believe what we’re telling them too.

Yet, when we are talking about ourselves we are not as good of a friend.

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Anchors A-Weight

There are “big picture” and “smaller picture” health choices.

heart-with-graphA lump in one’s breast is “big picture.” Finding time to take a walk or choosing between deep fried or grilled chicken could be classified, “smaller picture.” Granted making enough wise “smaller picture” health choices is a “big picture” issue in the end. However for discussion sake, “big picture” issues are beyond the control of the every-person, requiring action without delay. “Smaller picture” issues provide choice and possess the luxury of time.

So, although lowering my sodium intake today, a smaller picture issue, will not have a direct affect in the immediate, it could – over time — determine whether or not I get high blood pressure and a stroke, a definite “big picture” issue.

The “big picture” is made of infinite “small pictures.”

“Big pictures” require more knowledge to correct than do “small pictures.” As example, no one has the wherewithal to preform self-administered angioplasty after suffering a myocardial infarction. Conversely, when it comes to the “small picture,” we usually possess enough understanding to know what to do. It doesn’t take a cardio surgeon’s expertise to know that a deep dish, 12-meat-special, 24-inch pizza infused with gooey, dripping, cheese crust is not as healthy as a veggie stir-fry. One need not be an Olympic athlete to recognize that a morning walk is healthier that catching up with gossip on “The View.” Even non-scholars comprehend that reading is a superior way to relax than is the third martini.

We appreciate these to be true. Moreover, unlike “big picture” decisions, we maintain control over our decisions and actions.

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