How to Make New Year’s Resolutions That Actually Benefit You

It’s That Time of Year.

Look at some of her resolutions - they're very funny.

This time of year, our thoughts turn to new beginnings in the New Year. If you are one of the about 50 percent of Americans who commit to a New Year’s resolution, you might be currently brainstorming for your very own self-improvement project.

However, if we successfully achieved every single New Year’s resolution, we wouldn’t need to make them every year, would we? We’d have the perfect outlook on life, maintain our ideal weight and have money saved in the bank.

Alas, only 8 percent of people surveyed by the University of Scranton’s Journal of Clinical Psychology reported success in achieving their resolution. In fact, 24 percent of respondents say they are never successful with their resolutions and fail every year. It can be demoralizing to fail and those setbacks could persuade us to stop setting goals altogether.

Instead of abandoning self-reflection and self-improvement, why not evaluate the types of goals we set? Are they unattainable from the start? Are we unrealistic? Here are some tips to help make New Year’s resolutions that are beneficial and attainable. [Read more…]

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Start Small and Go Big

Start small. Do more or add more if you want to.

man-looking-at-small-portionIt’s always easier to add more and it’s much more empowering than it is to feel bad about taking on too much.

This applies on many levels.

For example, if you’re trying to lose weight, take less than you want. (You can always go back from more but can’t give back what you eat.)

If you’re starting an exercise program, commit to a smaller realistic amount rather than an unwieldy longer time. (You can always add more.)

If you’re cleaning your house, promise yourself you’ll do one room really well instead of the whole house and get overwhelmed. (You can always do more if you want.)

 

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We Are Given the Tools We Need When We Need Them

girl-with-power-tool

Question: Could the 20-year “you” of so long ago run the complexities of the life you live today?

Answer: Definitely not.

Even if you had your act “together” at that young age, younger “you” did not have the knowledge nor the skills to manage all the details of the life you now have.

As they say, “You didn’t even know what you didn’t know.”

Yet, as you’ve aged and faced a myriad of experiences, you have grown and become wise, learning how to handle what is presented to you, eventually making it part of your routine.

[Read more…]

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Choose Your Identity

We have multiple identities.

woman-without-face-holding-face-on-mask

Lest you get concerned and think I’m talking about hearing voices instructing to do evil unto others, let me expand.

I’ll use me as an example; the identities I cannot change include:

  • Son
  • Father
  • Born of Jewish background in Detroit, Michigan in 1954 to Ruth and Symore (sic) Marcus

No matter what happens, nor how long I live, those will always be correct. But, they alone don’t make me who I am.

Therefore, my “core” must be found by other manners in which I identify.

  • 60-year old
  • Man
  • Husband
  • Resident of Eureka, California
  • American Citizen
  • Writer/Speaker/Consultant

These descriptions, while accurate, are more fluid than the first set.

I mean, we know for a fact that I can only identify as a “60-year-old” for this year; but do I change who I am if I change my marital status, residence, or even my gender? I think we’d all agree, that I would still be me. [Read more…]

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Success is in the Present; Failure is in the Future

When you don’t think you can accomplish your goal, it’s because you’re looking too far down the road.

© jonrawlinson.comYou’re thinking of all the things that could go wrong and of all the obstacles you must overcome, none of which exist if you can focus on the immediate.

When you’re overwhelmed and you’re afraid you won’t be able to achieve your goal, focus on what you can do right this minute.

Make it small enough that you’ll actually do it. [Read more…]

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