Expect More

dream-written-in-sand

Research has shown that our ancient ancestors were pessimists.

When you think about that, it makes sense. In their day, they always had to assume that everything would go wrong so they could anticipate problems in advance. That’s how they survived.

People who didn’t think “worst case scenario” that did not survive as long.

Although we are no longer living in those times, their genetics have been passed down to us and therefore, we’re basically “hard wired” to be pessimistic. We still tend to default to believing that if something can go wrong, it will.

What would it feel like to believe that we might actually do better than we thought?

How empowering would that be? What would you do differently if you assumed that your success would be greater than you imagined – rather than worse?

Dream bigger every chance you get.

It can’t hurt – and the ride will be much more fun no matter how it turns out.

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I Think Therefore I Become

Next to my bed is a nightstand.

man-in-bed-in-bedroom

I presume that is a common arrangement in many bedrooms. Upon the shelf of the nightstand are many books; this too I assume is widespread.

Like me, I take for granted that many people have three categories of books populating their nightstands:

Some wait to be read. While at a bookstore, the concept between its covers was so striking that I plunked down money, thinking, “I will read that someday.” Alas, “someday” has yet to make its appearance. Being optimistic, I’m sure it will (probably about the same time as when “I get my act together”).

The second classification is books started but still unfinished. Maybe I lost interest, the story was not as expected, or simply “life kicked in.” I could give them away but feel like I betrayed them, (does co-dependence apply to books?) so I pledge to finish reading them in the future. Until that fateful moment, they too shall gather dust.

Finally comes the definitive category: Books completed. Residing here include authors such as Robert B. Parker, Dean Koonz, and Roger McBride Allen. Most are novels because I like to “escape.” However, there is one self-help book I have read over and over again. Although I do not buy into everything she says, You Can Heal Your Life by Louise Hay is infused with 210 pages of brilliantly simple wisdom (usually the best kind).

Hay’s philosophy, outlined in the foreword, includes:

  • We are each responsible for our experiences
  • Resentment, criticism, and guilt are damaging, and
  • It’s only a thought, which can be changed.

Furthermore, says Hay, feelings are “thoughts that stick.”

[Read more…]

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There are Always More Options

3-arrows-1-way

“The highest form of intelligence is the ability to see options.”

Just like you, I’m always looking to improve myself.

So, I attended a three day conference to help me enhance my career. One of the speakers, Jeff Walker, said the comment I referenced above.

It really stood out.

I don’t know whether it’s because it’s a new year and we find ourselves faced with options or whether it’s because it’s just so honestly, simply, true. It really doesn’t matter.

What does matter is that we are not victims of “the way it has always been.”

We have the option to change at any time. And if what we pick doesn’t work, we have the option to change again (or the option to redefine what we’re looking at).

Alternatives are endless, constant, and available.

Choose your option. Repeat until happy.

[Read more…]

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How to Get Whatever You Want

Sigh… if only everything we wanted just – poof! – materialized.

magic_hat_and_wand

Rather, anything we desire comes to us only through a very specific process – if it arrives at all. It matters not whether it’s trivial, mundane, or life altering. There is an unalterable four-step progression. More importantly, that entire sequence moves forward based entirely on the words we use in our heads.

Step one: I realize I want something.

Many times, we mistakenly say, “need;” but in actuality, it’s “want.” After all, if we were really motivated to go after what we needed, we’d all be healthy and fit with great attitudes and perfect relationships, wouldn’t we? We take action – or we don’t, because we want to – or don’t, NOT because we need to.

Let’s use a specific example: The holidays are nigh and I know I will see family. Neither wanting snide comments nor condescending sneers, I decide to drop a few pounds. To my previous point, I’ve needed to lose weight for some time, but until I wanted to, I was not motivated. Now, having entered this “acceptance stage,” I acknowledge that not only do I need to – but also I actually want the results that will come from it.

I am in motion.

Upon acceptance, the search for validation that it can or cannot be achieved commences.

[Read more…]

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Believe in the Best

girlpraying

Believe that everything happens for the best.

You have two choices in what you believe about what happens:

  1. You can believe that everything happens by chance; randomly. We are just leaves in the wind.
  2. You can believe that everything happens for a reason.

There is no right nor wrong choice.

However, if you choose to believe that everything happens for a reason; you might as well believe it happens for a good one.

[Read more…]

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